Communication Among Patients and Practitioners: Enhancing Adherence and Safety


Module Status: Not Started
Overview

More than one-third of U.S. patients are health illiterate and older adult health literacy levels are lower than younger adults. Lower health literacy is related to low patient adherence, poor health quality and outcomes, reduced patient safety, and higher rates of disease and mortality. Participate in this module to learn about health literacy disparities across populations and to develop strategies to address poor health literacy. This module will enable you to create and deliver patient education strategies using a variety of skills and communication techniques to meet the needs of the older adult population.

Author Information

Naomi Twigg, PhD, PHCNS-BC, RN
Associate Professor
Department of Health Systems Science
Institute for Healthcare Innovation
Co-Investigator, ENGAGE-IL
University of Illinois at Chicago

Ashkan Zarrieneh, MPH
Research Specialist (2015-2016), ENGAGE-IL
University of Illinois at Chicago

Authors Bios:

Dr. Naomi Twigg, PhD, MS, has been practicing as a Registered Nurse since 2003 and as an Advance Practice Nurse since 2008. Currently, she teaches graduate courses in public health at the College of Nursing. Her program of research is focused on the development of a model to address the aftercare service needs of domestic minors of sex trafficking. Her clinical expertise as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Public Health is in care coordination/case management, transitional care, chronic care management and critical incident management for individuals with disabilities residing in the community.

Ashkan Zarrieneh, MPH, received both his bachelor’s in Neuroscience and Masters in Public Health from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is very delighted to have been part of the ENGAGE-IL initiative. His research has primarily been based in the aging field and he is looking forward to continue working with the geriatric population to develop multiple mechanisms in extending their lifespan.

Editors:
Valerie Gruss PhD, APN, CNP-BC
Clinical Assistant Professor
College of Nursing
Director, ENGAGE-IL
University of Illinois at Chicago

Memoona Hasnain MD, MHPE, PhD
Professor and Associate Department Head, Faculty Development & Research
College of Medicine,
Department of Family Medicine
Co-Director, ENGAGE-IL
University of Illinois at Chicago

Expert Interviewee:
Naomi Twigg, PhD, PHCNS-BC, RN
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Health Systems Science
Institute for Healthcare Innovation
Co-Investigator, ENGAGE-IL
University of Illinois at Chicago

Module Information

Duration: 30 minutes
Format: Video Stream & pdfs

Module Guide and Handout
Resources & References
Continuing Education Credit Information

In support of patient care, Rush University Medical Center is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

Rush University Medical Center designates this live activity for a maximum of (0.5) AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This activity is being presented without bias and without commercial support.

ANCC Credit Designation – Nurses
The maximum number of hours awarded for this CE activity is 0.5 contact hours.

Rush University is an approved provider for physical therapy (216.000272), occupational therapy, respiratory therapy, social work (159.001203), nutrition, speech-audiology, and psychology by the Illinois Department of Professional Regulation. Rush University designates this live activity for (0.5) Continuing Education credit(s).

Rush University Medical Center designates this knowledge based CPE activity (JA0000275-0000-18-061-H04-P, JA0000275-0000-18-061-H04-T) for 0.5 contact hours for pharmacists.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this module, learners will be able to:

Restate health literacy disparities across populations
Discuss the impact of low health literacy on patient safety and health outcomes
Summarize how the Health Literate Care Model can be applied to practice
Identify tools from the Health Literacy Universal Precautions Toolkit that can be used to promote better health outcomes and improve safety
Identify key tips for creating and delivering health education using a variety of written and online sources

Technical Support / Contact Info

For technical support, please notify engage@engageil.com.

To report a complaint, please contact the ENGAGE-IL Program Help Desk at engageIL@engageil.com.

This ENGAGE-IL learning activity fully complies with the legal requirements of the ADA and the rules and regulations thereof. Learners with special needs can make requests for accommodation at any time by sending e-mail to engageIL@engageil.com.